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Today’s top health stories 22 April


April 22, 2015

Seventy percent of cancer sufferers are battling other significant health problems

Image source: Daily Telegraph – Alamy
Image source: Daily Telegraph – Alamy

Macmillan Cancer Support have released a new report suggesting that 1.8 million patients with cancer also suffer from other chronic conditions such as heart disease, arthritis or diabetes. Experts concur that cancer sufferers have a greater risk at developing chronic conditions as a consequence to either of their disease, or the treatment for it. A condition such as obesity, which increases the risk of cancer, is more likely to increase the risk of other health problems. The charity said the study illustrates the challenges facing patients as health issues are often treated as separately when in fact a “holistic” approach is needed.

Source: Daily Telegraph

The most significant breakthrough in the treatment of Alzheimer’s could be on its way

Image source: Daily Telegraph – Almay
Image source: Daily Telegraph – Almay

People with early stages of Alzheimer’s disease are being recruited for a trial to test a new treatment. The drug liraglutide, normally used for diabetes, was originally trialled on mice and showed promising results in reducing the damage caused by dementia and improving memory. This could be the first treatment to reverse the progression of the condition. Scientists said it could be a breakthrough in the treatment of dementia if the study proves positive in humans

Source: Daily Telegraph, Daily Mirror, Cambridge News

Ovarian cancer drug can be used to treat prostate cancer

Image source: Daily Telegraph – Alamy
Image source: Daily Telegraph – Alamy

New research shows that a pioneering drug intended for women with ovarian cancer can be used to treat men with terminal prostate cancer. The drug, olaparib, is the first drug to target inherited genetic mutations. The trial showed the drug was able to stop cancer growth, and that it could be highly effective at fighting 30 percent of advanced prostate cancer cases. “The use of DNA testing to identify mutations like BRCA and direct treatment to them is a huge step in that direction and so these early results are very exciting”, said Dr Iain Frame, director of research at the charity Prostate Cancer UK.

Source: Daily Telegraph, Daily Mirror, Daily Mail