PRofessionals in the Making

With summer coming to an end, our interns are headed back to school. While we will miss them, we’re excited for them to take some real-world experiences back to campus with them!

In honor of their last week in the office, we sat down and interviewed them about their time at Tonic this summer.

First, learn a little more:

  • Michael Milliken
    • Rising senior at Villanova University studying Marketing with a minor in Analytics
    • Fun fact? My mom played tennis with Tina Fey in high school!
  • Alexa Fabbri
    • Rising junior at Villanova University studying Communications with a Public Relations focus and minor in Sociology
    • Fun fact? I don’t get mosquito bites! (Did you know, there are people who have genetic alterations that allow them to avoid bites?!)
  • Alex Skinner
    • King’s College of London studying Biomedical Science
    • Fun fact? I’m a bit of an adrenaline junkie. I have done a skydive and am about to do a bungee jump!

Why healthcare communications?

  • Michael – My mom works in healthcare so I had an initial interest, then the opportunity to work specifically on analytics across the agency presented itself. This interest stood out – to see how the many parts of an agency come together across PR and measurement.
  • Alexa – My entire family has professional healthcare experience so I wanted to see if I would like it as well.
  • Alex – I love science, but don’t enjoy lab research. I thought healthcare communications would be a great way to stay in science, minus the lab coat.

What was your impression of Tonic on your first day?

  • Michael – At my last job, every day I made the coffee so when I saw the Keurig I thought, “what are they going to make me do?!”
  • Alexa – After I walked in and was introduced to everyone I sat down and just thought, “What now? What do you do for lunch?”
  • Alex – I thought I might just be making teas all day but it was in fact the complete opposite! Everyone was really lovely and helpful and couldn’t wait to get me involved in all their different projects.

What was the most interesting thing you learned from working at a PR agency?

  • Michael – I learned the teams all work together, always bouncing ideas off one another. Compared to other roles, the environment at a PR agency is more collaborative.
  • Alexa – I didn’t realize how many different disease states Tonic worked in. I always thought there would be a few that everyone focused on but every time I was handed a new project, it was a new disease!
  • Alex –  I really enjoyed leaning more about all the different drugs and diseases. I had no idea that Tonic would work on so many projects in one go so it was great to work on loads of different things during my time here.

What was your favorite thing you worked on in your time at Tonic?

  • Michael – I enjoyed gaining experiences from various databases and platforms that otherwise I would not have access to. I could use these tools to look into advocacy groups and read real patient stories. It was cool to see their stories and the large patient communities.
  • Alexa – My favorite thing was working on the pharma research and development side. It was meaningful and felt worthwhile to be part of something that could save a life or change the world in the future.
  • Alex – I really enjoyed the patient and consumer side of the work as everything I have done before has been very data focused, so it’s been great doing something so different.

What is your advice for others who are thinking about interning or careers in PR? 

  • Michael – A PR agency isn’t just PR! There is more to it than just writing and PR, a lot of work goes into the company to make it successful, so don’t discount the opportunity.
  • Alexa – To have an open mind! I had no idea what research & development was my first day but I have learned a ton, you never know what you’re going to learn and do!
  • Alex – PR is so much more than what you think it is. Every day is different and there is loads going on. I had no idea how much PR agencies actually did!

Any parting tips to future interns or classmates looking at internships?

  • Michael – Do your time sheet! And don’t sign up for too many Google alerts.
  • Alexa – Always check your emails!
  • Alex – If you want to get some experience don’t be scared to just email some companies and see if they have any internships available, that’s exactly how I got mine at Tonic!

 

Transforming into a Digital Disruptor: Lessons Learned from #MMMSkillSets Live

By: Samantha Garcia, Senior Account Executive, and Rachael Schwartz, Vice President

EHR. Biopharma. Ethnographic data. Digital disruption. These pharmaceutical marketing terms buzzed around the room during the April 12th Medical Marketing and Media Magazine (MMM) Skill Set Live event in Philadelphia. The line-up of speakers included key industry leaders like Lisa Flaiz, Group Product Director at Janssen, David Stievater, Director at Epocrates Solutions Design and Athena Health, Dr. Theodore F. Search, Founder & CEO at Skipta, and Will Reese, President and CIO at Cadient.

Kicking things off, Flaiz spoke to the importance of taking a fresh approach to innovation, viewing tech as an enabler and not a strategy unto itself, and creating valuable digital experiences for patients and doctors. “Patients aren’t going to Google or Bing just at diagnosis,” she said. “They are using search throughout their entire journey and are no longer relying solely on their health care providers for information, guidance and support.” With the knowledge that patients are going on the internet in between doctor visits and beginning their (sometimes terrifying) search of the unknown, pharma marketers have the opportunity to make their relatable information discoverable, understandable and, most importantly, accessible with the help from search engine optimization (SEO). Interestingly enough, this area of “digital” is often overlooked – a missed opportunity to the pharma marketer. Major kudos to Lisa Flaiz for opening our digital eyes to techniques that can make or break a business plan and ways to differentiate those techniques from the crowded marketplace.

Epocrates Solutions Design’s David Stievater took the podium and drove home the importance of turning a challenge into an opportunity. Audience members were highly engaged as he explained that the key to success in digital healthcare revolves around the delicate balance of the present and the future – leveraging proven digital channels to reach and engage the full market audience in cost-effective ways, while testing new strategies with the use of digital health, electronic health records (EHR) platforms and health system partnerships. From the eyes of a PR professional whose clients consist of highly-regulated pharmaceutical companies, it was intriguing to hear Stievater’s take on today’s marketing challenges and how, as an industry, we need to do a better job of fostering and inspiring innovation.

Skipta’s Theodore Search provided the audience with some key insights around the importance of a holistic approach to mastering the power of social media – a tool we use quite often at Tonic Life Communications to help our clients expand their voice.

Will Reese of Cadient brought it all together for us when he honed in on interconnected strategies that marketers can use for transforming the digital healthcare experience. He spoke about the importance of drafting the customer experience – customer satisfaction needs to be brought into the development. Putting the patient/customer first and deeply understanding behavior during the stages of business planning and development is the key to success in this industry. Hats off to Reese for a great presentation, plus this awesome closing quote: “Never forget to ask ‘what if’ and ‘how,’ otherwise you’ll never know.”

So, do you feel prepared to transform into a digital disruptor? Share your thoughts with us here or on Twitter mentioning the handle @TonicLC.  Thanks to MM&M for hosting the event and inspiring rich dialogue around a topic near and dear to us at Tonic!

SXSW 2016: The Takeaway….and the Tacos

By Rachael Schwartz, Vice President

Howdy! Heading back from the whirlwind of SXSW 2016, or as veteran attendees simply call it, “South By.” As a SXSW newbie, the energy and excitement can be a bit overwhelming, but I did my best to focus on the missions at hand:

  • Uncover the latest in digital health
  • Pinpoint the critical role(s) of communications in the advancement of healthcare

Of course there was a lot to sidetrack my intentions. The event was chock-full of great talks from once-in-a-lifetime keynotes (including President Obama and Brene Brown), fascinating installations and exhibits (IBM Cognitive Lab, 3M exhibit, Save the Inventor), and not to mention, all the yummy food.

Yet, with all that said, I spent most of my time within the Health & MedTech track. Although it’s still relatively new to the Interactive side of SXSW, the Track managed to attract thousands of attendees, including executives all across the healthcare continuum—from digital health and health tech companies to forward-thinking HCPs and leading patient advocates who embrace social/digital—as well as a few pharma companies looking for their voice in this arena. There were talks showcasing the latest in:

  • Medical apps
  • Digital health devices and medicines
  • Regulation and guidelines
  • Bioelectronics
  • Robotics
  • Chronic disease management
  • And so much more…

As you can imagine, the passion and excitement around new digital health advances was truly palpable. In fact, presentations like “The Future of Medicine: Where Can Tech Take Us?” given by Stanford and Harvard trained physician-scientist, Daniel Kraft, MD, showcased a litany of various digital health tools (from wearables to ring’ables and even hear’ables). While Dr. Kraft ran through the tools that we have come to know and accept into our vernacular (e.g., fitness trackers, e-watches, e-stethescopes and e-otoscopes), he also presented a robust rundown of the lesser known, Jetson-ish products that were either deep into development or just introduced in the marketplace. Of course, there were “Oo’s” and “ah’s,” even laughter at times around the preposterous products, but by the end of his rundown, it became clear that digital health tools are absolutely making waves by gaining major attention among consumers, and more importantly, there is definitely no turning back now.

Upon reflection on Dr. Kraft’s talk and many others through the course of the three-day conference, there seemed to be a common thread and similar spirit—super-duper excitement mixed with pain-staking void. Let me break that down. There is no doubt that healthcare technology innovation has exploded in remarkable ways, but there also seems to be a climax for most of these products when they are hit with a major buzzkill. This reality-check moment points to a clear gap between innovative hardware and the way our current evidence-based healthcare organizations are built to understand its value.

The message was loud and clear during “Imagining the Future of Personalized Medicine,” which featured top execs from Proteus Digital Health and Chrono Therapeutics that we need to go way beyond medical apps, and truly converge hardware, software, analytics, and therapies/medicine in order to deliver real impact with personalized healthcare. These speakers also pointed to the mass confusion that has been created among today’s consumers through the availability of health apps. Proteus’ Chief Product Officer, David O’Reilly, even said, “We are doing a really good job at confusing our patients. No wonder we aren’t getting the outcomes we want.” He continued, “It is time for the industry to focus on creating actionable insights.”

SXSW 2016 showed me that there has been tremendous work done to build a solid foundation for digital health, and now it is time to take it to the next level. But in order to complete the circuit (pardon the tech pun) and realize the real power of digital in our healthcare world, there is a great deal of work that needs to be done across and among all healthcare delivery stakeholders. This means not only will payers, providers, and even drugmakers need to adapt current mindsets (and ultimately structures) to accommodate new ways of looking at evidence, but technology innovators will need to demonstrate clear value and greater opportunity for integration among existing (approved) systems, products, etc.

This is truly an awesome time in healthcare and communications is at the heart of ensuring a steady heartbeat internally and externally across the industry. In order to get to this next level, we need to effectively communicate with one another to better understand the needs of each stakeholder and then ultimately build bridges to ensure alignment towards our mutual goals and objectives. Let me be clear, there is no time to pause here otherwise the moment will be realized by others. Keep moving in the right direction, build on the excitement and energy in this space, and in the end, we will achieve what we are all after in this industry—healthier and fuller lives of our customers.

Thanks for the memories and the insights SXSW!

 

Scratching the Surface: Technology’s Impact on Healthcare Communications

By Rachael Schwartz, Vice President

Healthcare meet tech, tech meet healthcare. It’s been brewing for some time, but the digital health industry has reached a major inflection point. From wearable sensors and point-of-care diagnostics, to Artificial Intelligence, robotics, virtual reality, 3D printing and more, the convergence of accelerating technologies is seriously changing medicine and the way patients interact with their healthcare.

The proof is not only in the innovation, but also in the investments. Last year alone, digital health investments topped $4 billion, plus tech giants are rolling out their very own health and life science specialty divisions (e.g., Verily, Qualcomm Life, IBM Watson Health), and of course (why we are here), pharma is trickling in with strategic partnerships (e.g., Qualcomm/Novartis, 23andMe/Pfizer). This all begs the question – is this a fad or a glimpse of more to come?

As healthcare PR professionals, it has always been our job to stay on the pulse of technology and maximize the tools that make the most sense for our clients. Yet today, our tool kit is bursting at the seams and has ushered in an entire new category, which has vast implications across the healthcare industry. So, how do we stay on top of this booming health technology, and most importantly, what do our pharma clients need to know about digital health?

It seems like every day we are seeing more media reports on the newest sensor, health app, device, etc. and often they overlap with a therapeutic area that we work within. But, does every technology that overlaps in our interest areas need to be flagged and pursued by our clients? Not necessarily. Knowing the intricacies of the brands and credos of the companies that we work with is critical to how we vet and pursue (or not pursue) new technologies. It’s also helpful to remember that digital health is not yet top of mind for all our pharma colleagues, and therefore, informing them of an interesting technology may be falling on deaf ears or at least ears that have yet to be exposed to a digital health ear device (not my best digital health humor, but a solid attempt). Bottom line, we need to know how our clients are viewing and prioritizing digital health (sometimes broadly coined “innovation” internally) in order to appropriately guide our strategic counsel. By getting this overall digital health temperature check, we can proactively audit and flag technologies and opportunities that have the potential to bring additional value to the patients our clients serve.

Naturally, our innovative positioning know-how coupled with our specialized ability to influence key stakeholders creates a solid foundation for whatever new technologies come our way. Just as we in PR evolved our business to leverage and maximize social platforms, we now look to the plethora of digital health innovations to take us to yet another level of what we are all in this for: patient care. So, bring it on, digital health!

Stay tuned for an even deeper dive into the world of digital health later this month following my trip to SxSW Interactive. The Med Health track is filled with leaders across the industry and will surely inform our overall approach to digital health at Tonic Life Communications.