Today’s top health stories: 22 January

Heavy drinking rates amongst youth linked to alcohol TV ads

Image source: Frame Store

A study has found that youths who are highly receptive to alcohol advertisements on television are more likely to develop drinking problems in the future.

Young people aged 15 – 23 were asked which advertisements they remembered seeing on television, with those who recalled alcohol adverts incurring drinking, binge drinking or hazardous drinking at a higher rate than those who did not remember alcohol adverts.

The study suggests that the marketing concepts and campaigns of alcohol companies could be impacting upon the chances of young people turning to alcohol.

Source: Reuters

 

20 minutes of exercise weekly could be enough for healthy life – experts

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Following criticisms of NHS Guidelines being overly ambitious with their recommendation of 150 minutes of exercise a week, studies have shown that as little as 20 minutes of vigorous exercise a week could be enough to avoid an early death.

The recommendation of 20 minutes a week comes from the British Medical Journal, with the author suggesting that encouraging the end of sedentary life, rather than a life of high exercise, could be more beneficial in getting people more healthy.

The report concludes that research into the effect of promoting reduced sedentary behaviour and increasing light activities is lacking.

Sources: The Guardian, British Medical Journal

 

Cigarettes could be sold in plain packages from as early as next year

Image source: Pharmaceutical Journal

After years of debate, the Government has announced that regulations towards enforced plain and standardised packages for cigarettes will be put to a free vote before the general election.

The news has come on the same day that a Washington state attorney general has campaigned to raise the legal smoking age in the state to 21.

The brand names of the cigarettes will still be placed on the boxes, as well as smoking health warnings.

Sources: The Independent, Reuters

Today’s top health stories: 16 January

App released that can help scientists research the cure for Alzheimer’s

Image source: SBNation

A new app has been released on the Google Play store that ‘donates’ a phone’s processing power towards Alzheimer’s research while the owner is not using the device.

Vijay Pande, a leading doctor and part of the team behind Alzheimer’s research, believes that there needs to be around 150,000 ‘phone-days’ for the next major breakthrough to take place. It is thought that the app could make a large contribution in speeding up Alzheimer’s research.

Folding@Home is available now on Android devices and Google Chrome via the Google Play Store.

Source: The Independent

Salt increases the risk of stomach cancer

Image source: KevinMD

New research suggests that salt increases the risk of stomach cancer, according to statistics provided by NHS Choices.

Along with the long-established connection between salt and high blood pressure and heart disease, salt encourages the growth of a bacteria that inflames the stomach, leading to cancer.

Current British salt targets for adults is no more than six grams per day, with the World Health Organization suggesting five grams.

Source: Express

 

Breakthrough in the reasons behind shell shock brain injury

Image source: Independent

Scientists have made a major breakthrough in shell shock, the reaction of trauma incurred by soldiers who have been a part of warfare.

One century since when the first cases of shell shock were identified during World War One, scientists believe that they have identified a unique brain injury that impacts upon decision making and reasoning.

The Veterans’ mental health charity Combat Stress estimates that around 50,000 veterans will suffer from a mental health problem as a result of the conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Source: The Independent

Today’s top health stories: 12 January

NHS patients to be offered self-referral cancer tests

Image source: The Guardian

As part of the NHS’s target to diagnose 10% more people with cancer at its early stages than in 2014, patients are to be given the option of booking referral appointments directly with hospitals and testing units instead of first visiting a GP.

The NHS believe that a 10% increase in early stage cancer diagnosis would mean that the number of patients alive five years after diagnosis would increase by 8,000.

As well as introducing self-referral bookings to patients, other NHS initiatives under the same scheme are:

  • Tests for different types of cancers at the same time and day of original appointments
  • Fast-tracking of patients through community pharmacists when cancer symptoms are suspected and ongoing
  • GPs to send patients for cancer tests without having to first refer to a cancer specialist

Source: BBC News, The Independent

National Obesity Forum warn that treating obesity could ‘break the NHS’

Image source: Locally Healthy

In a bid to slow the increasing cost of obesity on the NHS, the National Obesity Forum has stated their desire for annual weight monitoring of every adult.

Obesity costs the NHS £45 billion per year, with the National Obesity Forum warning that the costs could ‘break the NHS’. In the last two decades obesity levels have doubled, with 67% of men now overweight or obese. This week is also National Obesity Awareness Week.

Highlighting the obesity epidemic in Europe and the Western hemisphere, last week the American Medical Association voted to classify obesity as a disease.

Sources: The Daily Mail, Prevention

WHO: e-learning for doctors and nurses as effective as traditional training

Image source: Thrivase

The World Health Organization has advised that electronic education for some healthcare professionals can be just as successful as face-to-face education. It is hoped that the WHO’s approval will go towards encouraging more people to train in healthcare, helping to plug the 7.2 million shortfall of healthcare professionals worldwide.

The study, conducted at Imperial College London, found that distance learning and electronic education enables greater access to teaching. However, barriers still exist at places where electronic media and the Internet are not regularly available.

Source: Reuters

 

Today’s top health stories: 08 January

Pharma companies threaten legal action over NHS England’s decision to halt access to expensive drugs

Image source: The Guardian

Pharma companies have expressed their discontent at NHS England’s expected plans to remove access to a range of medicines due to their high prices.

NHS England’s Cancer Drugs Fund, which was set up to allow patients access to drugs regardless of their cost and has been used by 55,000 people, is set to be £100m over budget by the end of the financial year.

Medicines which will be no longer paid by the fund include breast cancer drugs Eisai’s Halaven (eribulin, breast cancer), Sanofi’s Zaltrap (Aflibercept, bowel cancer) and Roche’s Kadcyla (Trastuzumab emtansine, bowel cancer).

Chief executive of Myeloma UK, Eric Lowe, believes that the Cancer Drugs Fund is unsustainable and a “policy anomaly”.

Sources: Financial Times, BBC News

 

Scientists discover 25 new antibiotics in clinical study

Image source: Institute for Creation Research


Following a three-year gap since the last clinical discovery of antibiotics, a novel approach to cultivating bacteria has led to a yield of 25 new antibiotics.

These new antibiotics, described by the researchers as the “tip of the iceberg” in their published journal in Nature, could potentially revive antibiotic discovery.

Recent decades have seen microbes become increasingly resistant to antibiotics, leading to so-called ‘super bugs’ which have caused media stirs.

Source: BBC News

 

Signs that Ebola is slowing in Sierra Leone

Image source: MarketWatch

Although 248 new confirmed cases of Ebola have been reported in Sierra Leone during the past week, the spread of Ebola in the country appears to be slowing according to the World Health Organisation.

Ebola cases in Sierra Leone far outstrip those of any other country, with almost 10,000 cases and 3000 deaths. Ebola cases are still underreported throughout western Africa.

Ismail Ould Cheikh Ahmed, head of the United Nations Ebola response team, is warning against complacency in Sierra Leone against the continual threat of Ebola:  “It is only at this moment of optimism and relative success that sometimes we are worried of a sense of complacency”.

Sources: Reuters, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention